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Job 1, Part 1

  • 2011-06-24 | Guy Berry
  • Audio: Length: 39:21 Size: 6.8 MB

Turn to Job 40. I thought I would do some messages on the book of Job. My parents made us go to church when we were young. When I became a teenager, I rebelled. Still, off and on at different times in my life, I have been under the hearing of the Word, but I have never heard many studies or sermons from the book of Job. This book seems to be more difficult to sort out and to understand, possibly because it is older. I am not sure. I do not think that anyone has ever pinned down exactly the time that these events were taking place. We will look at Job’s three friends. Perhaps they give us some hints. I believe that the timeframe is anywhere from 1800 B.C. to the time of the exodus. It is somewhere in there, but no one is sure.

I would like to just read right now from Job 40 and then we will go back to the beginning to get a little bit of an overview of the whole book. We read in Job 40:1-14:

Moreover JEHOVAH answered Job, and said, Shall he that contendeth with the Almighty instruct him? he that reproveth God, let him answer it. Then Job answered JEHOVAH, and said, Behold, I am vile; what shall I answer thee? I will lay mine hand upon my mouth. Once have I spoken; but I will not answer: yea, twice; but I will proceed no further. Then answered JEHOVAH unto Job out of the whirlwind, and said, Gird up thy loins now like a man: I will demand of thee, and declare thou unto me. Wilt thou also disannul my judgment? wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayest be righteous? Hast thou an arm like God? or canst thou thunder with a voice like him? Deck thyself now with majesty and excellency; and array thyself with glory and beauty. Cast abroad the rage of thy wrath: and behold every one that is proud, and abase him. Look on every one that is proud, and bring him low; and tread down the wicked in their place. Hide them in the dust together; and bind their faces in secret. Then will I also confess unto thee that thine own right hand can save thee.

We will get back to this in a little bit.

If we turn back to the beginning of Job, we read in Job 1:1:

There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed evil.

This word “eschewed” means “to put away,” i.e., “to put away evil.” This also says, “That man was perfect.” This means that Job was saved. God had imputed the righteousness of Christ to Job. Therefore, when God looked at Job, He saw the perfection of Christ. Job was a saved man, but it is generally known that Job was also a figure of Christ; and so we will look at the affliction that God put on him. As we look at Job’s faithfulness, we will see Christ all through this book of Job.

So Job 1:1 says again:

There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect [tam:H8535]…

Turn to the Song of Solomon. We know that the Song of Solomon is an exchange between Christ and His Bride, the church. It is an exchange of love, and we read in Song 5:1:

I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey; I have drunk my wine with my milk: eat, O friends; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved.

In Song 5:2, it is now the church speaking. We read in Song 5:2:

I sleep, but my heart waketh: it is the voice of my beloved that knocketh, saying, Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled [tam:H8535]…

“Undefiled” is the word “perfect” that we find in Job 1:1.

Song 5:2 continues:

…Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled [tam:H8535]…

The true Church or the true believers are “undefiled” because they are perfect in the eyes of Christ. This goes on to say:

…Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled [tam:H8535]: for my head is filled with dew, and my locks with the drops of the night.

So we read again in Job 1:1:

There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect [tam:H8535] and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed [put away] evil.

The land of Uz was in the land of Edom. We can see this in Lamentations 4. God is speaking about judgment in this book, but Lamentations is certainly the lament of Jeremiah when Jerusalem was destroyed. God is now speaking about how the nations that have fought against Jerusalem would be destroyed. He is speaking about Edom and He says in Lamentations 4:21:

Rejoice and be glad, O daughter of Edom, that dwellest in the land of Uz; the cup also shall pass through unto thee: thou shalt be drunken, and shalt make thyself naked.

So Edom is associated with the land of Uz where Job is from.

Again, the whole book of Job is a parable of the sufferings of Christ. In the Bible, Esau is a picture of Satan. He was a twin brother of Jacob and he was as much a full-blooded son of Isaac as Jacob was; but he is a picture of Satan.

We read in Isaiah 63 of Christ coming from suffering the wrath of God for the sins of the elect, and He speaks of this as having been performed in Edom. If Esau is a picture of Satan, certainly Edom would be a picture of hell. Isaiah 63:1-3 says:

Who is this that cometh from Edom, with dyed garments from Bozrah? this that is glorious in his apparel, travelling in the greatness of his strength? I that speak in righteousness, mighty to save. Wherefore art thou red in thine apparel, and thy garments like him that treadeth in the winefat? I have trodden the winepress alone; and of the people there was none with me: for I will tread them in mine anger, and trample them in my fury; and their blood shall be sprinkled upon my garments, and I will stain all my raiment.

He is speaking of having suffered the wrath of God. His garments are stained with blood and He is anticipating the final judgment when there will be again that blood. He says:

…I will tread them in mine anger, and trample them in my fury; and their blood shall be sprinkled upon my garments…

So the land of Uz is associated with Edom, and it says again in Job 1:1:

There was a man in the land of Uz…

This does not say that Job was from the land of Uz or of the land of Uz. It just says that he was “in the land of Uz.” Again, this whole story is a parable of Christ suffering the wrath of God; and, here, Job is in the land of Uz.

We then read:

…whose name was Job ['iyowb:H347]…

The word “Job” actually means “enemy” or “hated,” as in someone who is hated. In the atonement, it was as if Christ was under the hatred of God or it was as if He was an enemy.

Look at Job 13. This is Job speaking. Job 13:20-23 says:

Only do not two things unto me: then will I not hide myself from thee. Withdraw thine hand far from me: and let not thy dread make me afraid. Then call thou, and I will answer: or let me speak, and answer thou me. How many are mine iniquities and sins? make me to know my transgression and my sin.

In a couple of places in this book, Job is speaking as if he wants to speak to God and ask him why this suffering is upon him.

Then we read in Job 13:24:

Wherefore hidest thou thy face, and holdest me for thine enemy ['oyeb:H341]?

This word “enemy” is a form of the same word that the name Job comes from. In the atonement, it is as if Christ is the enemy of God. This is why this man’s name is Job.

Again, we read in Job 1:1:

There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed evil.

Then we read in Job 1:2-3:

And there were born unto him seven sons and three daughters. His substance also was seven thousand sheep…

He was a very rich man. There are rich men in the Bible, such as Abraham or Jacob, men who had a lot of flocks, or the kings of Israel. In their richness, they are pictures of Christ who owns all of the riches of this world.

So Job was a very rich man, and then we read in Job 1:6:

Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before JEHOVAH, and Satan came also among them.

This is before the time of the cross when Satan was actually allowed in Heaven. There are a couple of different passages in the Old Testament concerning this.

Then we read in Job 1:7-12:

And JEHOVAH said unto Satan, Whence comest thou? Then Satan answered JEHOVAH, and said, From going to and fro in the earth, and from walking up and down in it. And JEHOVAH said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil? Then Satan answered JEHOVAH, and said, Doth Job fear God for nought? Hast not thou made an hedge about him, and about his house, and about all that he hath on every side? thou hast blessed the work of his hands, and his substance is increased in the land. But put forth thine hand now, and touch all that he hath, and he will curse thee to thy face. And JEHOVAH said unto Satan, Behold, all that he hath is in thy power; only upon himself put not forth thine hand. So Satan went forth from the presence of JEHOVAH.

We go on to read that all of Jobs flocks and herds were taken from him. His seven sons and his three daughters were eating and drinking in the eldest son’s house when the house collapsed. The seven sons were killed, but it does not say anything about the daughters.

We read in Job 1:18-19:

While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, Thy sons and thy daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother's house: And, behold, there came a great wind from the wilderness, and smote the four corners of the house, and it fell upon the young men, and they are dead; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.

So all of these things came upon Job, and then we read in Job 1:20-22:

Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped, And said, Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return thither: JEHOVAH gave, and JEHOVAH hath taken away; blessed be the name of JEHOVAH. In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.

He remained perfectly faithful. In this, Job is a picture of Christ.

So Satan comes before God again, and we read in Job 2:3-10:

And JEHOVAH said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil? and still he holdeth fast his integrity, although thou movedst me against him, to destroy him without cause. And Satan answered JEHOVAH, and said, Skin for skin, yea, all that a man hath will he give for his life. But put forth thine hand now, and touch his bone and his flesh, and he will curse thee to thy face. And JEHOVAH said unto Satan, Behold, he is in thine hand; but save his life. So went Satan forth from the presence of JEHOVAH, and smote Job with sore boils from the sole of his foot unto his crown. And he took him a potsherd to scrape himself withal; and he sat down among the ashes. Then said his wife unto him, Dost thou still retain thine integrity? curse God, and die. But he said unto her, Thou speakest as one of the foolish women speaketh. What? shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil? In all this did not Job sin with his lips.

Again, Job remains perfectly faithful to God.

Notice that the affliction of Job, who is a picture of Christ, was in two stages. First, God allowed Satan to take his flocks and his herds from him, all of his wealth, as well as his sons. Then Job’s body was physically afflicted. There is spiritual significance in this.

Then we read about Job’s three friends who come to comfort him, to console him, and yet they do not even begin to console him at all. They instead begin immediately to outright say to him that he has sinned against God and that this is the reason for why God is afflicting him.

If you look at the three names - Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite - you can find two of these names in the genealogy of Esau. Esau had a son named Eliphaz who had a son named Teman. This Eliphaz the Temanite was probably another generation or two down, but we cannot say this for certain. I do not remember which one; either Bildad or Zophar, one of their lines was also among the sons that Abraham had by Keturah, the woman whom Abraham took for a wife after Sarah died. But, again, we do not know exactly where in time this took place, so we cannot be certain about any of this; but it looks like none of them were in the blessed line. The blessed line goes from Abraham to Isaac to Jacob, to Jacob’s twelve sons. The blessed line is the line that the theologians call the line through which Christ came.

Although these men were blood descendants of Abraham, and even though they were sons of Isaac, as Esau was a twin son of Jacob, God uses Edom and Ammon and Moab as pictures. He uses them in the Bible as pictures of the church, of those in the church who are in rebellion. He uses them as figures, but we will not get into this right now.

Then in Job 3:1-5, we read:

After this opened Job his mouth, and cursed his day. And Job spake, and said, Let the day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said, There is a man child conceived. Let that day be darkness; let not God regard it from above, neither let the light shine upon it. Let darkness and the shadow of death stain it; let a cloud dwell upon it; let the blackness of the day terrify it.

Then we read in Job 3:7-8:

Lo, let that night be solitary, let no joyful voice come therein. Let them curse it that curse the day, who are ready to raise up their mourning.

The sense of this whole chapter is one of night and darkness and the curse.

What we are speaking of here is that Christ was under the curse of God. He became a curse for us. This is a fundamental part of the Gospel. Christ became a curse for the elect.

His friends begin to speak in Job 4. Immediately, as I said, they begin to find fault with Job. Even though we cannot say this for certain, these three men are probably a picture of those in the church who cannot fully understand. They do not fully understand Christ or exactly how the Gospel works. I am not saying that these men were saved or unsaved, though. In the end when God appeared, God was angry with these three friends because they had gotten some things wrong about Job; but He told them that Job would pray for them and to make sacrifices. Somehow these men picture those in the church who do not have full understanding.

Then in Job 4, we find Eliphaz speaking. He says to Job in Job 4:7-8:

Remember, I pray thee, who ever perished, being innocent? or where were the righteous cut off? Even as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same.

Eliphaz is suggesting that Job sinned. God is bringing judgment against him for doing this.

Look at Job 11. This is Zophar speaking. We read in Job 11:1-6:

Then answered Zophar the Naamathite, and said, Should not the multitude of words be answered? and should a man full of talk be justified? Should thy lies make men hold their peace?…

They are already getting angry at Job. They are offended because Job is maintaining that he is righteous and that he would like to reason with God and ask him why these things have been brought upon him. This is why these men are already getting angry at Job.

It continues:

Should thy lies make men hold their peace? and when thou mockest, shall no man make thee ashamed? For thou hast said, My doctrine is pure, and I am clean in thine eyes. But oh that God would speak, and open his lips against thee; And that he would show thee the secrets of wisdom, that they are double to that which is! Know therefore that God exacteth of thee less than thine iniquity deserveth.

So these men are accusing Job of sin, and yet these guys say some beautiful things. They go on for about 20 chapters of Job saying a lot of faithful and beautiful things.

Look at what Zophar says here at the end of Job 11:6:

…Know therefore that God exacteth of thee less than thine iniquity deserveth.

This is perfectly accurate when we speak of sinners who have been saved.

Look at Psalm 103. We read in Psalm 103:8-9:

JEHOVAH is merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and plenteous in mercy. He will not always chide: neither will he keep his anger for ever.

Look at Psalm 103:10 now:

He hath not dealt with us after our sins; nor rewarded us according to our iniquities.

In Psalm 130:3, it says:

If thou, JEHOVAH, shouldest mark iniquities, O Lord, who shall stand?

If God kept tract of our individual sins, none of us could stand; but the sins of a child of God have been wiped out.

So here in Job 11:6, Zophar says something that is perfectly faithful:

…Know therefore that God exacteth of thee less than thine iniquity deserveth.

Turn to Job 22. This is Messianic. This is Eliphaz speaking again. We read in Job 22:1-7:

Then Eliphaz the Temanite answered and said, Can a man be profitable unto God, as he that is wise may be profitable unto himself? Is it any pleasure to the Almighty, that thou art righteous? or is it gain to him, that thou makest thy ways perfect? Will he reprove thee for fear of thee? will he enter with thee into judgment? Is not thy wickedness great? and thine iniquities infinite? For thou hast taken a pledge from thy brother for nought, and stripped the naked of their clothing. Thou hast not given water to the weary to drink, and thou hast withholden bread from the hungry.

Do you know what Eliphaz is speaking of here? He is speaking of our sins. These sins were upon Christ as He paid for them. Job, however, continues to maintain that he is righteous.

Turn back to Job 6. Job is speaking to his three friends and says in Job 6:22-24:

Did I say, Bring unto me? or, Give a reward for me of your substance? Or, Deliver me from the enemy's hand? or, Redeem me from the hand of the mighty? Teach me, and I will hold my tongue: and cause me to understand wherein I have erred.

Job is still questioning why this judgment is on him.

Look at Job 9. Job says in Job 9:17:

For he breaketh me with a tempest, and multiplieth my wounds without cause.

Or look at Job 10:1-8. Job is still speaking:

My soul is weary of my life; I will leave my complaint upon myself; I will speak in the bitterness of my soul. I will say unto God, Do not condemn me; show me wherefore thou contendest with me. Is it good unto thee that thou shouldest oppress, that thou shouldest despise the work of thine hands, and shine upon the counsel of the wicked? Hast thou eyes of flesh? or seest thou as man seeth? Are thy days as the days of man? are thy years as man's days, That thou inquirest after mine iniquity, and searchest after my sin? Thou knowest that I am not wicked; and there is none that can deliver out of thine hand. Thine hands have made me and fashioned me together round about; yet thou dost destroy me.

We read this also in Psalm 119:73:

Thy hands have made me and fashioned me…

Job 10 is Messianic. This is Christ speaking, but this just offends Job’s three friends.

So in a couple of places, Job expresses his desire to talk to God and to reason with Him, as we read in Job 13. Job is speaking to his three friends again and says in Job 13:1-4:

Lo, mine eye hath seen all this, mine ear hath heard and understood it. What ye know, the same do I know also: I am not inferior unto you. Surely I would speak to the Almighty, and I desire to reason with God. But ye are forgers of lies, ye are all physicians of no value.

A physician in the Bible is someone who is supposed to heal someone. They should be bringing the true Gospel. He is speaking of the church here as “physicians of no value.”

Look at Job 23. We read in Job 23:1-8:

Then Job answered and said, Even to day is my complaint bitter: my stroke is heavier than my groaning. Oh that I knew where I might find him! that I might come even to his seat! I would order my cause before him, and fill my mouth with arguments. I would know the words which he would answer me, and understand what he would say unto me. Will he plead against me with his great power? No; but he would put strength in me. There the righteous might dispute with him; so should I be delivered for ever from my judge. Behold, I go forward, but he is not there; and backward, but I cannot perceive him:

Job is frustrated that he cannot speak to God, that God is not there. He desires to reason with God.

Look at Job 16. They are getting angry with each other. He is speaking back to his three friends in Job 16. We read in Job 16:1-2:

Then Job answered and said, I have heard many such things: miserable comforters are ye all.

Look at what we read in Psalm 35. This is also Messianic. We read in Psalm 35:11-15:

False witnesses did rise up; they laid to my charge things that I knew not. They rewarded me evil for good to the spoiling of my soul. But as for me, when they were sick, my clothing was sackcloth: I humbled my soul with fasting; and my prayer returned into mine own bosom. I behaved myself as though he had been my friend or brother: I bowed down heavily, as one that mourneth for his mother. But in mine adversity they rejoiced, and gathered themselves together: yea, the abjects gathered themselves together against me, and I knew it not; they did tear me, and ceased not:

This is Messianic. This is Christ speaking here of how He had compassion, especially when His church fell so far away and sinned and turned to idols. They were sick and He was grieved by this.

So Job is telling his friends: “miserable comforters are ye all.” The church is not like Christ. They are not grieved with the sins of their loved ones or with the sins of the world around them, and they were not really doing the work of God in loving their neighbor by bringing them the true Gospel.

This exchange goes on until chapter 32; then Elihu comes on the scene. We will not speak about him right now, but he says a couple of things that suggest that he himself is God. For example, we read in Job 33:3-4:

My words shall be of the uprightness of my heart: and my lips shall utter knowledge clearly. The spirit of God hath made me, and the breath of the Almighty hath given me life.

He says some other things that suggest that he has perfect understanding.

But after Elihu is done speaking, then God appears in Job 38. We read in Job 38:1-3:

Then JEHOVAH answered Job out of the whirlwind, and said, Who is this that darkeneth counsel by words without knowledge? Gird up now thy loins like a man; for I will demand of thee, and answer thou me.

He is speaking to Job. Remember that Job is a human being. Job is a figure of Christ, but he is also human and he has some things wrong himself. God is now reproving Job and says to him in Job 38:3:

Gird up now thy loins like a man…

When we read this expression of girding up one’s loins, the sense of this expression is, “Let us get down to work!” But we know that the girdle of his loins is righteousness, because this also has spiritual applications. This is what the sense is when we read of someone girding up their loins. They are going to work.

Then He says again in Job 38:2:

Who is this that darkeneth counsel by words without knowledge?

“Counsel” in the Bible refers to the Word of God. God tells Job that He is darkening it “by words without knowledge.”

God goes on next to talk about His glory and who He is. He says in Job 38:4-9:

Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth? declare, if thou hast understanding. Who hath laid the measures thereof, if thou knowest? or who hath stretched the line upon it? Whereupon are the foundations thereof fastened? or who laid the corner stone thereof; When the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy? Or who shut up the sea with doors, when it brake forth, as if it had issued out of the womb? When I made the cloud the garment thereof, and thick darkness a swaddlingband for it,

He goes on for two chapters speaking like this.

In Job 39:1-2, He is still talking to Job. He says:

Knowest thou the time when the wild goats of the rock bring forth? or canst thou mark when the hinds do calve? Canst thou number the months that they fulfil? or knowest thou the time when they bring forth?

Let us go back to Job 38. I want to read something in that chapter. We read in Job 38:22-28:

Hast thou entered into the treasures of the snow? or hast thou seen the treasures of the hail, Which I have reserved against the time of trouble, against the day of battle and war? By what way is the light parted, which scattereth the east wind upon the earth? Who hath divided a watercourse for the overflowing of waters, or a way for the lightning of thunder; To cause it to rain on the earth, where no man is; on the wilderness, wherein there is no man; To satisfy the desolate and waste ground; and to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth? Hath the rain a father? or who hath begotten the drops of dew?

I remember something that still sticks with me today. Around twenty years ago, someone was doing a Bible study on the Gospel and the creation. I believe that they cited this. Then He basically said, “When you complain about the weather, you are cursing God; because it is God who makes the very weather.” We have to glorify God in everything. This stuck with me all of these years.

Let us go to back to Job 40 now and I will finish this. I just wanted to speak about this passage in Job 40. We read in Job 40:1-4:

Moreover JEHOVAH answered Job, and said, Shall he that contendeth with the Almighty instruct him?…

In other words, God is asking Job, “Are you going to instruct Me?”

It continues:

…he that reproveth [or correcteth] God, let him answer it. Then Job answered JEHOVAH, and said, Behold, I am vile; what shall I answer thee? I will lay mine hand upon my mouth.

We read in numerous places in the Bible of men who were confronted by God. They suddenly just dropped to their knees. When Peter saw the Lord work that miracle with the fish, we read that he “fell down at Jesus' knees, saying, Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord.” When God appeared to Daniel, we read that Daniel “fainted, and was sick certain days.” When Abraham was pleading to God for Sodom if there had been anyone righteous in the city, we read in Genesis 18:27:

And Abraham answered and said, Behold now, I have taken upon me to speak unto the Lord, which am but dust and ashes:

This is the attitude of men in the Bible when they are confronted with the Lord Himself. In our humility and in our contrition, we are crushed.

Returning to Job 40, we read where Job says in Job 40:4-7:

Behold, I am vile; what shall I answer thee? I will lay mine hand upon my mouth. Once have I spoken; but I will not answer: yea, twice; but I will proceed no further. Then answered JEHOVAH unto Job out of the whirlwind, and said, Gird up thy loins now like a man: I will demand of thee, and declare thou unto me.

In other words, God is saying that He is going to ask Job some questions and Job is to give Him some answers. God says in Job 40:8-13:

Wilt thou also disannul my judgment? wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayest be righteous? Hast thou an arm like God? or canst thou thunder with a voice like him? Deck thyself now with majesty and excellency; and array thyself with glory and beauty. Cast abroad the rage of thy wrath: and behold every one that is proud, and abase him. Look on every one that is proud, and bring him low; and tread down the wicked in their place. Hide them in the dust together; and bind their faces in secret.

In other words, if Job could do all of these things, God says to him in Job 40:14:

Then will I also confess unto thee that thine own right hand can save thee.

We do absolutely nothing in salvation. We are dead. We are raised to life by the mercy of God and by His sovereign grace, but God is saying here to Job in Job 40:9:

Hast thou an arm like God?…

In the Bible, the arm speaks of strength as well as the will; and God is asking Job, “Do you have an arm like God?”

Look a Psalm 44. We read in Psalm 44:1-3:

We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work thou didst in their days, in the times of old. How thou didst drive out the heathen with thy hand, and plantedst them; how thou didst afflict the people, and cast them out. For they got not the land in possession by their own sword, neither did their own arm save them: but thy right hand, and thine arm, and the light of thy countenance, because thou hadst a favour unto them.

This is speaking of salvation being entirely by the will of God, by the strength of God in Jesus Christ, and by the “light of thy countenance, because thou hadst a favour unto them.” They were named by God. His favor was upon them from before the foundations of the world. He says here that this is “but (by) thy right hand.” In Psalm 80, it defines Christ as “the man of thy right hand.”

So again back in Job 40:9, God is speaking and says:

Hast thou an arm like God? or canst thou thunder with a voice like him?

Then He goes on to say that if Job could do all of these things that He can do, Job 40:14:

Then will I also confess unto thee that thine own right hand can save thee.

This is utterly impossible for man as this speaks to the majesty and the glory of God, to His mercy and His sovereign grace in salvation.

We will stop here. This is a difficult book, but maybe we will be able to do more studies in this book, Lord willing.

Father in Heaven, we come to You and say could it be that we have expounded correctly on what we have looked at in the book of Job here tonight. If we have seen what You have intended for man to see in this Book, this is only by Your mercy. We thank You for this and we thank You that You have given mankind this Book, a Book that is not like any book on earth. This Book came from You. When we sit and ponder the things in this Book, we are sitting at Your feet. We just thank You for Your glory and for Your majesty. We thank You for our very lives. Our breath is in Your hands. We only have our physical life because of You. Could it be that we would simply want to glorify You until that Day and talk of all of Your wondrous works. We pray this in Jesus Name. Amen.

 

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